Jury Report: IDFA DocLab Competition 2016

Overall we were hugely impressed with the range of projects in competition – from interactive web documentaries, physical installations, audio tours and interventions both physical and digital to still emerging VR forms. Unifying this range, it's clear that the programmers are championing emerging creators, thereby showcasing the exciting new talents that are taking bold risks and exploring new forms in a rapidly changing landscape. The projects also reminded us that sometimes the simplest, even traditional, approaches can be the most effective. Disruption is not obligatory. We want to congratulate all the creators in competition on making highly engaging, thought-provoking works that tackles a huge range of issues with their own unique perspectives, great style, narrative and technical ambition. We look forward to seeing more work from you all. It goes without saying that this was a really tough year to judge, but we feel the two projects we have highlighted weaved together sound, vision and narrative to bring us emotionally affecting storytelling that – fittingly for DocLab – would only be possible using their chosen forms.

Scenic IDFA DocLab Immersive Non-Fiction Award
For the immersive prize, we were moved by a work which employed varied techniques to progress the narrative and challenge the relativism inherent in personal viewpoints. We felt ill, uncomfortable, and saw talent. In our current global climate, sometimes its important we don’t look away. We encourage the maker to continue to take chances, and contribute to this new medium's evolving language.
The winner of the IDFA DocLab Immersive Non-Fiction Award is DeathTolls Experience by Ali Eslami.

IDFA DocLab Award for Digital Storytelling
The work we selected for the digital storytelling award lured us into a world where escaping seems impossible. As you move forward through a simplified landscape you listen to people whose experiences are reflected in the world around you. In this documentary the virtual gives a human perspective on how people fall victim to to indoctrination as adolescents, and how they find their way back.
The winner of the IDFA DocLab Award for Digital Storytelling is Deprogrammed by Mia Donovan.
 

Jury Biographies

Brett Gaylor is a Canadian documentary filmmaker and the director of Advocacy Media for the Mozilla Foundation. His most recent project, Do Not Track, is a co-production of Upian, the National Film Board of Canada, Arte France and Bayerischer Rundfunk, in association with Radio-Canada, Radio Télévision Suisse and Al Jazeera’s AJ+ network. It is the recipient of the International Documentary Association Award for Best Nonfiction Series, the Prix Gémeaux for Best Interactive Series, the International Association of Broadcasters Online Factual Prize, the Deutscher Prize for Online Communications, and the 2016 Peabody Award.  His 2008 feature documentary Rip! A Remix Manifesto was the recipient of IDFA’s Audience Award. It was broadcast in 20 countries and seen by millions worldwide.

Anna Higgs is an award-winning British producer and creative executive who leads groundbreaking work at the intersection of film and digital storytelling. Higgs has recently taken up the position of Creative Director at NOWNESS, a global video channel bringing together the best in culture, with the best of emerging and established filmmaking voices. Prior to joining NOWNESS, she was Head of Digital at Film4, spearheading innovation for the Oscar-winning film fund with projects including Ben Wheatley’s A Field in England, Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard’s 20,000 Days on Earth, Ken Loach’s The Spirit of '45 and Lenny Abrahamson’s Frank. Other credits include Ben Wheatley’s High-Rise, Sundance-winner Dark Horse, directed by Louise Osmond, and Peter Strickland’s The Duke of Burgundy. Higgs was named as one of Time Out's inaugural Culture 100, described as "the innovators, visionaries and pioneers behind what's now and what's next," alongside Danny Boyle and Steve McQueen.

Dutch artist Jan Rothuizen realized at an early age that he would be a better artist wandering the streets of cities than working within the confines of a studio. Since then he has exhibited internationally and published a range of books. In 2009, Rothuizen published The Soft Atlas of Amsterdam, a collection of hand-drawn maps of the city he grew up in. He makes monthly reportage drawings for the Dutch daily de Volkskrant. In 2014, he developed the interactive web documentary Refugee Republic, currently exhibited at the MoMA in New York. Rothuizen won the 2015 IDFA Award for Best Interactive Storytelling with Drawing Room, a hand-drawn VR experience of his artist’s residency on top of Amsterdam’s Dam Square.
Call for Entry: IDFA Bertha Fund December 22, 2016 | The IDFA Bertha Fund is looking for new creative documentary projects from developing countries for both its classic program and the IBF Europe distribution scheme.
Ally Derks receives Pioneer Award December 12, 2016 | Last Saturday, Ally Derks received a prestigious Pioneer Award from the International Documentary Association.
Open Call: Short Web Documentaries November 26, 2016 | IDFA and Jos de Putter from Deep Focus Web Documentaries invite entries for project proposals from talented (young) filmmakers.

Twitter

IDFAindustry @IDFAindustry 8 days ago
RT @EDNEDN: Next up: MEET THE FESTIVALS @ 11:00 at the #MeetTheDocs stand w/ @SheffDocFest @hotdocs @krakowfilmfest ... https://t.co/GjKUX0…
Open
IDFAindustry @IDFAindustry 8 days ago
RT @orwany: Friends at #EFM, join us today at 16:00, White hall, MGB, "Storytelling in post-truth world", w/ #JoaoMSalles, urs truly & host…
Open
BankGiro LoterijVPROOxfam Novibde VolkskrantFonds 21VSBfonds