Me

    • set 20 items

    IDFA presents a main focus program, Me, about the personal and autobiographical documentary film. Me is a selection of different cinematic expressions by filmmakers whose study of themselves is both a journey into their own private history as well as an artistic exploration. The program consists of around 20 documentaries, both classics and premieres, from different regions, made by both a new generation of filmmakers as well as established auteurs. Many of these filmmakers, among them Naomi Kawase, Mahamat Saleh Haroun and Sara Fattahi, will discuss their films at the festival.

    Items in this selection

    Birth/Mother

    • Naomi Kawase
    • 2006

    This intensely intimate and sometimes painful film is part of Naomi Kawase’s series of short films about her adoptive mother.

    Bye Bye Africa

    • Mahamat-Saleh Haroun
    • 1999

    A director returns to Chad after 15 years. A blend of fiction and non-fiction about filmmaking and the need for an African film culture.

    Chaos

    • Sara Fattahi
    • 2018

    What does war do to your mind? Three Syrian women make us their companions in grief and inner disengagement. Winner of a Golden Leopard at Locarno.

    Embracing

    • Naomi Kawase
    • 1992

    In this first film in a short series about her family, Naomi Kawase searches for her father.

    Extremely Private Eros: Love Song 1974

    • Kazuo Hara
    • 1974

    A taboo-breaking report on what the sexual revolution does to the filmmaker and to the woman who leaves him to find herself.

    Father and Son

    • Pawel Lozinski
    • 2013

    A road trip with Pawel Lozinski and his father alternates painful memories with moments of warmth.

    Father and Son on a Journey

    • Marcel Lozinski
    • 2013

    A road trip with Marcel Lozinski and his son alternates painful memories with moments of warmth.

    Fix Me

    • Raed Andoni
    • 2009

    A searingly honest investigation by Palestinian filmmaker Raed Andoni into the cause of his headaches and memory loss.

    Happy Birthday, Mr. Mograbi

    • Avi Mograbi
    • 1999

    With sardonic humor, filmmaker Avi Mograbi takes stock of his personal situation and that of his country, as Israel marks its 50th anniversary.

    Heart of a Dog

    • Laurie Anderson
    • 2015

    Laurie Anderson’s kaleidoscopic film sees the multimedia artist meandering through life, love, death and language, with her dog Lolabelle as the leitmotif.

    Katatsumori

    • Naomi Kawase
    • 1994

    Naomi Kawase’s affectionate and poignant portrait of the great-aunt who adopted her, and of their intimate bond.

    The Missing Picture

    • Rithy Panh
    • 2013

    Using clay figures, Rithy Panh recreates the history of his own family during the Khmer Rouge military dictatorship.

    News from Home

    • Chantal Akerman
    • 1977

    A fantastic time capsule of 1970s New York. Alongside images of urban desolation, Chantal Akerman reads aloud letters from her mother.

    Photographs

    • Andrés Di Tella
    • 2007

    An investigation by Argentine director Andrés Di Tella into his mother’s Indian origins, and ultimately his own identity.

    Room for a Man

    • Anthony Chidiac
    • 2017

    An intimate essay in which the gay Lebanese filmmaker Anthony Chidiac explores his own identity and the hostile society in which he lives.

    Room Without a View

    • Rada Šešić
    • 1997

    Filmmaker Rada Šešić fled Sarajevo in 1993. In this lyrical collage, she depicts what it means to pick up the tatters of your life in a new place.

    Sherman’s March

    • Ross McElwee
    • 1986

    An exploration of the American South in the footsteps of the much-despised general William Sherman keeps getting derailed by the interventions of southern belles.

    A Strange Love Affair with Ego

    • Ester Gould
    • 2015

    Admiration for her sister Rowan’s self-confidence prompts filmmaker Ester Gould to explore our narcissistic society, with disconcerting results.

    Wednesday 19.7.1961

    • Victor Kossakovsky
    • 1997

    A portrait of the dozens of St. Petersburg residents who were born on Wednesday, July 19, 1961: Victor Kossakovsky’s own birthday.

    Yukiko

    • Young Sun Noh
    • 2018

    A poetic musing in which the Korean filmmaker Young Sun Noh dreams about her Japanese grandmother, whom she never knew.