Patricio Guzmán Retrospective

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    On the occasion of Guzmán’s first visit to IDFA, we pay tribute to the documentary icon with a retrospective of seven films from his oeuvre. The program will present the seminal trilogy The Battle of Chile (1975-1979), the pioneering Chile, Obstinate Memory (1997), and Guzmán’s latest trilogy which culminates in The Cordillera of Dreams (2019). Read more about the Retrospective here.

    See the films

    The Battle of Chile: The Insurrection of the Bourgeoisie

    • Patricio Guzmán
    • 1975

    In the spring of 1973, just before the parliamentary elections in Chile, Patricio Guzmán and his crew began to film the political and social events unfolding in the country. Part one of a trilogy on the Chilean coup.

    The Battle of Chile: The Coup d’État

    • Patricio Guzmán
    • 1976

    A meticulous account of the run-up to the military coup in Chile, after which filmmaker Patricio Guzmán fled the country. Part two of Guzmán’s trilogy on the Chilean coup of September 11, 1973.

    The Battle of Chile: Popular Power

    • Patricio Guzmán
    • 1979

    In part three of his trilogy on the 1973 military coup in Chile, director Patricio Guzmán looks back over the final year of the democratically elected president Salvador Allende’s left-wing government.

    Chile, Obstinate Memory

    • Patricio Guzmán
    • 1997

    An investigation into the role of memory in Chile. Director Patricio Guzmán returns there after 23 years in exile, and for the first time ever in his country he screens The Battle of Chile, his trilogy about the 1973 coup.

    Nostalgia for the Light

    • Patricio Guzmán
    • 2010

    A gorgeous portrait of the driest place on earth, the Atacama Desert in Chile, where astronomers and archeologists conduct scientific research while women search for the remains of loved ones who disappeared during the Pinochet era.

    The Cordillera of Dreams

    • Patricio Guzmán
    • 2019

    In Chile, the peaks of the Andes are never far away—the mountain chain (cordillera) is the country’s rocky spine. The impassive, timeless landscape forms a moving contrast to the nation’s turbulent political history.

    The Pearl Button

    • Patricio Guzmán
    • 2015

    A lyrical meditation on Chile’s complex relationship with the sea. Measuring thousands of miles, the coastline was once home to nomadic peoples. Centuries later, dictator Augusto Pinochet used the Pacific Ocean as a mass grave.