Double Take

  • Johan Grimonprez
  • Belgium, Germany, Netherlands
  • 2009
  • 80 min
  • Paradocs
The Cold War, Hitchcock, and the rise of television are ingeniously interconnected in this collage of space-race news footage, hilarious coffee ads, and excerpts from Hitchcock's thrillers. Was the Cold War just one huge MacGuffin? Double Take is a cinematic elaboration of the installation "Looking for Alfred," which features a series of Hitchcock lookalikes. The film itself is a search for significance in coincidental events that echoes the mechanism of paranoia. Johan Grimonprez, who caused a furor with his documentary Dial H-I-S-T-O-R-Y, uses this elegantly composed essay to say a great deal about the rise of television and the way we view historical events. Starting with Nixon and Khrushchev's famous "kitchen debate" in 1959, television came to exert an ever-increasing influence on politics. Meanwhile, Hitchcock watched his TV show Alfred Hitchcock Presents get interrupted by advertisements for the first time. He liked to joke about the medium, saying, "Television is like the American toaster: you push the button and the same thing pops up every time." Double Take was inspired by Jorge Luis Borges's essay August 25, 1983. Placing mirrors next to mirrors, it allows a young Hitchcock to meet his older self, and is also a portrait of his doppelganger Ron Burrage.

Credits

  • 80 min
  • color / black and white
  • 35mm
Director
Johan Grimonprez
Production
Emmy Oost for Zap-O-Matik
Co-production
Volya Films, Nikovantastic Film
Cinematography
Martin Testar, Hans Buyse
Editing
Dieter Diependaele, Tyler Hubby

IDFA history

Share this film

Print this page

IDFA history

This website uses cookies.

By using cookies we can measure how our site is used, how it can be further improved and to personalize the content of online advertisements.

Read
 here everything about our cookie policy. If you choose to decline, we only place functional and analytical cookies