Bowling for Columbine

    • Michael Moore
    • United States
    • 2002
    • 120 min
    • Audience Favorites
    Littleton, Oklahoma, South Central LA, Ground Zero: places in the United States that were "put on the map" as a result of violence. But while the population is in shock, the arms production and the military interference in other countries just goes on. "How paranoid is America?" documentary filmmaker Michael Moore wonders. Is it tradition, history, or just plain fear? Starting with the Columbine tragedy, in which two teens opened fire on their fellow students and teachers before shooting themselves, Moore reflects on the use of violence and weapons in America. In spite of the serious subject matter, he uses an ironic tone to add some lightheartedness to his quest for answers. He pays a visit to the arms factory where some parents of the Columbine students work, he interviews shock-rocker Marilyn Manson and NRA chairman Charlton Heston, he is invited for coffee by the brother of Terry Nichols, who stood trial with Timothy McVeigh for blowing up the government building in Oklahoma, he examines the educational significance of bowling, and he tries to explain the large statistical difference between firearms victims in Canada and the United States. His findings are complemented by archive footage of the security cameras at Columbine High, excerpts from the animated series South Park, and Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World." Moore received an Oscar for this indictment of the arms insanity.

    Credits

    • 120 min
    • color / black and white
    • 35mm
    Director
    Michael Moore
    Production
    Michael Moore for Dog Eat Dog Productions, Michael Donovan for Salter Street Films, Charles Bishop for Salter Street Films
    Cinematography
    Brian Danitz, Michael McDonough
    Editing
    Kurt Engfehr
    Sound
    Francisco LaTorre, James Demer

    IDFA history

    2009
    Screened
    Audience Favorites
    2007
    Screened
    Audience Favorites
    2002
    Screened
    IDFA Competition for Feature-Length Documentary

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    IDFA history

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