Hunger

    • Marcus Vetter, Karin Steinberger
    • Germany
    • 2009
    • 90 min
    • World Premiere
    • Masters
    Never before has food production been as high as it is today. All the same, there are still increasing numbers of people suffering from starvation. The urban poor in Haiti eat pies that consist mostly of mud. In one region of Kenya, half the children die of undernourishment. Hunger gives five people the chance to speak, people for whom not a day passes when they get enough to eat. All of them are very aware of the hopelessness of their situation. Their interpretations of the causes of their misfortune are complemented by local experts and activists -- partly through interviews, but more often by following them as they go about their work. We see visits by a Greenpeace activist to the victims of logging and soybean cultivation in the Amazon (including shocking images of concealed slave labor) alongside footage showing the operations of a large soybean farmer. In Kenya, we visit both the Masai, who suffer from terrible droughts, and the rose nursery that uses all the available water in the area. Hunger uses a different approach to describe the situation in Haiti, India, and Mauritania, but the message is essentially the same: through globalization, urbanization, and large-scale genetically modified food production, existing agrarian practices are being completely disrupted. Societies and individuals are no longer able to produce their own food. Worse still, local knowledge and crops are being lost forever.

    Credits

    • 90 min
    • color
    • video
    • Spoken languages: English, Sinhalese, Portuguese, Marathi, Maasai, Haitian Creole, French
    • Subtitles in: English
    Director
    Marcus Vetter, Karin Steinberger
    Production
    Ulli Pfau for EIKON Suedwest GmbH
    Executive producer
    Ernst Ludwig Ganzert for EIKON Suedwest GmbH
    Cinematography
    Thomas Mauch, Marcus Vetter
    Editing
    Saskia Metten

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